PEL

Europeas

Linguas

Projektus

AVE!


That's how we say "hi" in European.

Welcome to the European Language Project (ELP), an out-of-the box, creative and slightly crazy approach to Europe's linguistic problems.


Dat is hoe wij "hoi" zeggen in het Europees.

Welkom op het Europees Taalproject (ETP), een innovatieve, creatieve en lichtelijk maffe poging om Europa's taalproblemen aan te pakken.


AVE!

Bonvenitus/a ad Europaeu LinguoProjektu (ELP), innovativus, kreativus et fuus atemptus a solvit linguoproblemas Europas.

CONTENTS


#1 Overview


#2 Phonology


#3 Morphology (cases in the singular)


#4 Examples


#1 Overview

The point of this experiment in "creative linguistics" is to investigate if it is possible to create a workable lingua franca for the E.U.. The aim is to show that we can solve the "European language question" (i.e. how can we build a united Europe without a common language of trade, politics, science and so on?) by using our creativity and our European ingenuity. Decades of limited, bureaucratic problem-solving has so far not resulted in an effective solution, so now we need to think creatively and well outside the box. The European Language Project is an attempt to see if we find a creative and workable answer to this question: A common secondary trade tongue which is acceptable and useable for all Europeans, without being a threat to Europe's existing languages.


European is in essence an "updated" version of Latin, which has been adapted to the General European tendencies, as well as expanded with influences from a variety of European languages. This makes it very different from its parent language, Latin, in the same way that Italian is different from Latin, even though European is morphologically closer to its PIE-roots.


In a nutshell: European is a constructed language, meant to be able to function as a culturally neutral, yet characteristically European, non-threatening (to Europe's natural languages) supplementary lingua franca. In other words: A language of trade, politics and science, which allows Europeans of various linguistic backgrounds to freely communicate with one another without having to rely on a means of communication (i.e.: a language) which is associated with any one country or culture.


The language is largely based on Latin, but supplemented to a very large degree with elements from other European languages, including (but not limited to): Greek, the Baltic languages, Dutch and German, Italian, the Slavic languages, and more ...


However, European borrows heavily from several language groups: Its vocabulary is largely that of Latin (although in adapted spelling), but its grammar is largely a mixture of Latin, Greek, Slavic, Baltic and (to some extend) Germanic and Finnic, while its phonology is largely based on the Romance and Slavic languages, especially since the fairly simple vowel inventories of these languages makes pronunciation as unambiguous as possible. For that same reason, for instance, I have chosen to replace Latin /c/ (where pronounced |k|) with /k/. So banca becomes banka.


It is designed to give a naturalistic alternative to "artificial"-looking constructed languages, specifically Esperanto (which I think is the only other realistic choice for a culturally neutral lingua franca for a united Europe). To achieve this, European has been created as a natural language, although without the large presence of unpredictable exceptions. This regularity, coupled with its clear and clearly Indo-European morphology, makes the language still easier to learn and reproduce with confidence than a "real" natural language. Nevertheless, the fact that European is (like so many European languages, including Latin) a fusional language (i.e. a language that changes the shapes of its words to indicate different grammatical/semantic functions) makes the language still more difficult to master than a highly analytical constructed language of the abstract variety, such as the highly regularized Esperanto. Nevertheless, European's complexity is of a level which should pose no problem for anyone who knows how to speak and write any of the bulk of Europe's languages, all of which have retained some kind of conjugation and declension, although speakers of the Slavic, Baltic, Finno-Ugrian languages or Greek should find it especially familiar and easy to get to grips with its inherent logical system.



# 2 Phonology & Alphabet [fonológia & alfabeta]

European uses an alphabet of 26 unaccented letters. These are the same letters as the English alphabet. The letter Q however, is never used in any native words.


the European alphabet

a | b | c | d | e | f | g | h | i | j | k | l | m | n | o | p | r | s | t | u | v | w | x | y | z


In addition to the 26 letters of the alphabet, there are also two ligatures. Ideally these should be written as 1 symbol, but can also be written as two separate letters representing 1 sound:

ae | oe


European uses an alphabet of 26 unaccented letters. These are the same letters as the English alphabet. The letter Q however, is never used in any native words.


# 3 Morphology (cases in singular)

[morfológia (kazi in singularie)]

Like its immediate parent language Latin, European declines its nouns and adjectives into cases to indicate certain grammatical functions and relationships within a sentence.


European has 6 cases, which are different according to the underlying gender (masculine/feminine) and number (singular/plural). The cases are:


#1 Nominative - marks the subject of a sentence. Can be translated as "the/a".

Typical identifiers of this case are words ending in -(u)s for masculine words and -a/-e for feminine words.


#2 Accusative - marks the direct object of a sentence. Can be translated as "the/a".

Typical identifiers of this case are words ending in -u or -i for both masculine and feminine words.


#3 Dative - marks the indirect object of a sentence. Can be translated as "to/for/at".

Typical identifiers of this case are words ending in -(u)m for masculine words and -ae for feminine words.


#4 Genitive - indicates a possessive relationship between words, i.e. that one word belongs to another. Can be translated as "of". Typical identifiers of this case are words ending in -o or -es for masculine words and -as or -es for feminine words.


#5 Locative - marks a location or place, or preposition. Can be translated as "in/at".

Typical identifiers of this case are words ending in -e for masculine words and -ae for feminine words.


#6 Vocative - marks a direct address or approach to someone or something. Can be translated as "o" or "hey, you!". A classic example: Et tu, Brute? - "And you, Brutus?" where "Brutus" is vocative case because Caesar addresses him personally. Typical identifiers of this case are words ending in -e for masculine words and -a for feminine words.


# 4 Examples (*)


Europea est basata su Latinae, sed néest Latina! Europea est idioma kreerata funkcionérat ki línguae francae per Europeu Unionu.

In English: "European is based on Latin, but isn't Latin! European is a language created to function as a/the lingua franca for the European Union."


Omnes humani sunt nati libre et ekwalie in dignitate et dirécums. Sunt investati ku mense et konsiencie et aktarant in fraterumo spírite*

In English: "All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are invested/endowed with reason and conscience and will/should act in a/the spirit of brotherhood"*.


(* these examples are samples of the current state of development of the language. They can and may change based on further developments.)


Notice: I only just started to add info & I update this page daily.

So please check back later.




Powered by

ESCHRAMA.com